The Vision for Planting

We’re planting 1,000 churches over 20 years in the hopes of introducing 100,000 people to Jesus and helping them grow as disciples.

Why plant churches?

People need to know the love of God and the power of that love in their lives. Church plants are more effective at reaching people who don’t know Jesus. Why? It’s simple: it’s their whole purpose. Evangelism is one of many focuses at an established church, but it’s the primary call of a church plant. 

We’re planting 1,000 churches over 20 years in the hopes of introducing 100,000 people to Jesus and helping them grow as disciples. 

God’s grace, the love and sacrifice of Jesus Christ, the power of the Holy Spirit—these things are transformative. Our lives will never be the same. We desperately want broken people, beloved of God and made in God’s image, to witness that power and wholeness in their lives. God is sovereign and will bring the gospel to the darkest places, so let’s be fearless.

A few people gather for Bible study around a table.

Church planting as research and development

Church plants are scrappy. They’re always trying new things to reach people with the good news of Jesus Christ. In some ways, that makes church planting the research and development arm of the church. When something works, it’s replicated as churches we’ve planted turn around and plant churches themselves. Right now, many of our experimental church plants are microchurches, which bring multiplication within reach of most churches and individuals. 

Past experiments that have now gone mainstream include parent churches and multi-site planting, as established churches start additional campuses to bring new people into relationship with Christ.

Types of plants

When you’re introducing 100,000 people to Jesus, there’s no such thing as one size fits all. Church plants take many forms and each have a personality all their own. Though our denomination, the Reformed Church in America, is primarily white, more than half of our church plants are led by planters of color. Many of the congregations are ethnically diverse, as well, which we celebrate.

These are the four types of church plants we’re working with most often right now.

Fresh Expressions

Starting highly contextual expressions of church for a changing culture, often organized around a shared interest, with covocational leaders.

Multiplication Center

New congregations come from sending churches that regularly plant. They often function in a multi-site model, adding campuses to bring new people into relationship with Christ.

International plants

Planting churches around the world in partnership with RCA Global Mission.

Classic plants

Sending teams into particular communities to start new churches that grow to become self-sustaining sending churches themselves.