Local Missional Engagement: Get Involved

Is local mission a passion of your congregation? We have several ways to get involved:

Consider joining a learning community focused on local mission. A learning community is a group of people from several congregations who meet together over a period of one to two years to learn, practice, and hold one another accountable for purposeful engagement in local mission. Each congregation is invited to send a pastor and three to five lay leaders to participate.

We also offer leadership cohorts focused on local mission. Leadership cohorts are similar in focus and process to learning communities, but are generally smaller groups for pastors only.  

Not sure how best to engage? The RCA’s Local Missional Engagement team is available for consultation to determine a good fit for your congregation and ministry context.  

To learn more, contact Eliza Bast, coordinator for Local Missional Engagement: ebast@rca.org or (616) 541-0849.

Stories about Local Missional Engagement

Reaching L.A.—One Neighborhood at a Time

In the core city of Los Angeles, church planting is under way to transform neighborhoods. The men and women being trained to lead these new churches grew up in and live in the neighborhoods they serve. And that’s why they’re effective.

Go Small or Go Home

At a time when community meant everything to Roger and Michele Bird, they left their 3,000-square-foot home and are building a house a third the size. Go figure.

Advocating for Education: Community’s efforts lead to a new school

Since the 1960s, the neighborhood of Highbridge in the Bronx, New York, has been without a middle school. That changed when Highbridge Community Church and its pastor, Cora Taitt, joined with other churches and organizations in the neighborhood to convince New York City’s Board of Education of the need for a new school.

Hope in Hard Times

Outreach in Wyoming, Michigan, means dealing with poverty. A new mentoring program aims to help kids succeed in school. One year in, it’s seeing some promising results.

Leader Sees Herself as Team Player

In a world where leadership is glamorized, glorified, and even the subject of academic degrees, Marion van den Akker resists the word.