Volunteers

In the West Bank, an arts camp offers kids the chance for joy—and, just maybe, peace.

This year, HIS Work Camp came with extra challenges. But those challenges showed students and staff that God works beyond what they can imagine.

Students on this summer’s Project Timothy trips did more than travel overseas for a week of service projects—instead, they learned how to lead.

In what was a life-changing experience for many of them, 13 members of First Reformed Church in Doon, Iowa, and Bethel Reformed Church in Lester, Iowa, traveled to San Jose, Costa Rica, on a mission trip June 13-22, 2014.

For Rachel Hashimoto, long-term volunteering in Japan was a great way to learn about the country and the culture there “without having to deal with taxes,” she jokes. But it was more than that, of course—it was a chance to quietly witness to others and share Christ’s love in a country where Christianity is a minority religion.

More and more, people want to volunteer in ways that build relationships with the people they serve.

When George Lundberg set out for his first Project Timothy mission trip, he expected to help people. He didn’t expect to get so much out of it himself. 

Volunteers from “up north” are encouraging the revitalized ministry underway at North Dade Community Church (NDCC), an RCA congregation in southeastern Florida.

With pastor Newton Fairweather leading, NDCC has found new ways to connect with its community, and its ministries are growing. But NDCC’s 1970s-era building needed a lot of work, and the congregation didn’t have the resources to make repairs.

On sign-up day, college students start lining up at 4:30 a.m., outside in the cold. They're not pledging fraternities or sororities--they want the first shot at a spot on spring break mission trips.

Twelve members from Reformed Church of Cortlandtown and their pastor, Amy Nyland, gave their time, energy, and gifts to serve with Habitat for Humanity in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, during Holy Week this year.