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Ridder Church Renewal: What are Albany Synod people saying?

By October 14, 2014 No Comments

God doesn’t just give a mission to the church, God calls the church to live their whole lives on mission. The Ridder process helps congregations to reorient themselves toward following that call.

“The church trying to catch up with the culture is like a horse and buggy chasing a speeding train.” When I heard this statement made by Jim Herrington, one of the developers of the Ridder process, I nodded. I recognized in his words the challenges faced by Albany Synod churches. How to best develop leadership for the church in a world that is so swiftly changing?

The Ridder Church Renewal process is focused on growing the emotional maturity of church leaders and pastors. These leaders and pastors are then better equipped to teach and lead their congregations, as they adapt to the changing world around them. God doesn’t just give a mission to the church, God calls the church to live their whole lives on mission. The Ridder process helps congregations to reorient themselves toward following that call.

Want to learn more about the Ridder Church Renewal process in the Regional Synod of Albany, and whether your church should sign up? Come to a Ridder “Taste and See” event, May 15-16, at the Kaatskill Mountain House in Hunter, New York. Call the Regional Synod of Albany to register: (518) 374-4573.”

—Abby Norton-Levering, Regional Synod of Albany ministries coordinator

“I was so blessed to be asked to commit to this Ridder experience. I have grown up in this process, and I continue to see changes in myself. I hope for bigger and better happenings for our church and our community through this process.”

—Cindy Parks, Schoharie Reformed Church

“For the Reformed Church of Prattsville, participating in Ridder (and Faithwalking) has opened our eyes to the ways we are already “on mission” in the world and it is giving us an incredible toolbox for making improvements to the ways we interact in our communities and workplaces. Following Hurricane Irene in 2011, we often felt that because we are small in numbers our impact was also small and insignificant—with no building, were we really a church?

Participating in Ridder has started a healing process, starting in our personal lives and extending through the congregation. We are beginning to understand the impact we are still having and that is encouraging us to be even more involved in our communities.”

—Becky Town, pastor, Reformed Dutch Church

“The greatest impact I am experiencing is in the outward discipline of service. Prior to Ridder, I thought I knew a great deal about service! What I have discovered is that true Christian service is not in the projects and events in which we participate, but in the attitude by which we conduct ourselves every day of our lives.”

—Mary Lou Ryan, Middleburgh Reformed Church

“Ridder has shown me how to integrate my personal calling from Christ into all aspects of my life. I still try to not bring my work into my family life, or my personal issues into my work. But praying to Christ and accepting his guidance has helped me pull all of my life together under his light. It has helped me feel whole again as a person.”

—Lucas Jacobs, Schoharie Reformed Church

“The Ridder readings and team fellowship have led me to a daily discipline of seeking God’s guidance and feeling his presence in all areas of my life. If I am having a disagreement with someone usually my anxieties rise and the “fight or flight” reflex kicks in. If I realize what is happening and look to God for his guidance, the anxieties lessen and I am able to listen with love, even if we are being guided in different directions. There are also times life gives me what I flatly do not want, deserve, or think I need. Now, instead of cursing fate, shutting down, and dredging up a host of old resentments, I am able to pray for acceptance, to seek God’s will in the situation, and to ask his guidance in moving on.”

—Buck Berdan, Schoharie Reformed Church